TU Wien Informatics

The New EU Proposal for AI Regulation

  • By Claudia Vitt (edt.)
  • 2021-06-08
  • Public Lecture
  • Social Responsibility

Irina Orssich (European Commission) aims at contributing to the public debate of how AI should be regulated in the future.

The New EU Proposal for AI Regulation

  • This event takes place online.
    See description for details.

The New EU Proposal for AI Regulation: Irina Orssich (European Commission)

Moderator & Respondent: Erich Prem (eutema & TU Wien, Austria)

Abstract

The European Commission has published its proposal for a new AI regulation. It takes a risk-based approach with different rules for low-risk applications of AI, stricter rules for riskier systems, and a complete ban for specified types of AI applications. Regulatory measures include data governance, transparency, information to users, and human oversight. The proposal also includes measures for supporting AI innovation through regulatory sandboxes.

The proposed regulation was met with great interest and criticism. It started an intense debate about its appropriateness, omissions, specificity, and practicability. With this lecture and the following discussion, Irina Orssich aims to improve the understanding of the proposal’s main objectives, methods, and instruments and contribute to the public debate of how AI should be regulated in the future.

Online Event

To participate, go to the following link, Password: 0dzqxqiy.

All talks will be streamed and recorded on the Digital Humanism YouTube channel. For announcements and slides see the website.

About the Series

Digital humanism deals with the complex relationship between man and machine. It acknowledges the potential of Informatics and IT. At the same time, it points to related apparent threats such as privacy violations, ethical concerns with AI, automation, and loss of jobs, and the ongoing monopolization on the Web. The Corona crisis has shown these two faces of the accelerated digitalization—we are in a crucial moment in time.

For this reason, we started a new initiative—DIGHUM lectures—with regular online events to discuss the different aspects of Digital Humanism. We will have a speaker on a specific topic (30 minutes) followed by a discussion of 30 minutes every second Tuesday of each month at 5:00 PM CEST. This crisis does seriously affect our mobility, but it also offers the possibility to participate in events from all over the world—let’s take this chance to meet virtually.