TU Wien Informatics

Vaccination Passports—a Tool for Liberation or the Opposite?

  • By Claudia Vitt (edt.)
  • 2021-04-20
  • Public Lecture
  • Social Responsibility

How can apps like the “Green Passport” be made reliable and privacy-preserving? And can they pave the way back to normality?

Vaccination Passports—a Tool for Liberation or the Opposite?

  • This event takes place online.
    See description for details.

Vaccination Passports—a tool for liberation or the opposite?

Ron Roozendaal (Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports, The Netherlands) and Nikolaus Forgó (University of Vienna, Austria)

Moderator: Walter Hötzendorfer (Research Institute – Digital Human Rights Center)

Abstract

The European Commission and its member states are discussing “Green Passports” as a way of opening up after lockdown. They have been proposed as tools to verify the COVID immunization status and thus help to accelerate the path to normality. However, similar to the contact tracing apps there are numerous issues and concerns about what these apps should be and how to make them safe, reliable, and privacy-preserving.

Director Ron Roozendaal from the Dutch Ministry of Health will talk about digital solutions, important design decisions, and the way forward. Prof. Nikolaus Forgo from the Department of Innovation and Digitalisation in Law will be his respondent.

Access

To participate, go to the following link, Password: 0dzqxqiy.

All talks will be streamed and recorded on the Digital Humanism YouTube channel. For announcements and slides see the website.

About the Series

Digital humanism deals with the complex relationship between man and machine. It acknowledges the potential of Informatics and IT. At the same time, it points to related apparent threats such as privacy violations, ethical concerns with AI, automation, and loss of jobs, and the ongoing monopolization on the Web. The Corona crisis has shown these two faces of the accelerated digitalization—we are in a crucial moment in time.

For this reason, we started a new initiative—DIGHUM lectures—with regular online events to discuss the different aspects of Digital Humanism. We will have a speaker on a specific topic (30 minutes) followed by a discussion of 30 minutes every second Tuesday of each month at 5:00 PM CEST. This crisis does seriously affect our mobility, but it also offers the possibility to participate in events from all over the world—let’s take this chance to meet virtually.